Warning On Sports And Energy Drinks

Warning On Sports And Energy Drinks

Caffeine | Caffeine in Coffee | Coffee or Energy Drinks | Energy Drinks under 18

From soccer fields to football stadiums across the country, young athletes are consuming many gallons of sports and energy drinks.

Water is infrequently the hydration drink of choice, especially among young athletes.

Energy Drinks: Should They Be Given To Children

Massive sports and energy drink advertising campaigns are directed at all ages and all ranges of physically active individuals. In fact, it is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the beverage market.

It is believed that the National Football League (NFL) has the most food and beverage sponsors, followed by the National Hockey League and Little League.

Energy Drinks And Sports Drinks

Energy drinks are beverages that claim to boost energy and make you feel less tired. There are also claims that it improve concentration, and contains ingredients like caffeine, sugar, taurine (an amino acid), herbs, and vitamins.

Sports drinks are flavored beverages that usually contain a mix of water, sugars, and minerals like salt, potassium, and magnesium. They can help replenish lost electrolytes as a result of sweating during intense activity.

Both energy and sports drinks can be unhealthy for your child and may play a role in obesity.

Although sports and caffeinated energy drinks are widely available and popular among children and youth, they can pose serious health risks.

When it comes to staying hydrated, water is still the best choice for kids, and it’s important that you learn the risks of using these beverages with your child. If you make healthy drink choices, your children are more likely to make similar choices too. We should be role models.

Warning On Sports And Energy Drinks

Sports Drinks

Sports drinks may be beneficial for kids who partake in prolonged vigorous physical activity, such as long-distance running and biking, or high-intensity exercise like soccer, and basketball.

These drinks contain carbohydrates in the form of sugar, which can provide an immediate source of energy at a time when the body’s stores are being depleted.

Sports drinks, just like energy drinks also contain electrolytes like sodium and potassium, which the body loses through sweat that is necessary to keep the body’s fluid levels in balance and for muscles to work well.

Sports drinks may aid hydration in kids during periods of intense activity. However, these drinks contain calories, too, and can increase the risk of excess weight gain. An active child, who drinks these in moderation, shouldn’t have a problem.

Sports drinks are not necessary for the casual athlete and should not be consumed on a consistent basis. Thus, if your sedentary child is a fan of sports beverages, you will have to consider sidelining these drinks in favor of plain water.

Warning On Sports And Energy Drinks

Vitamin Waters

Vitamin waters, also known as fitness waters or enhanced waters come in many flavors and contain various combinations of supplemental vitamins and minerals.

They also often contain extra calories, artificial sweeteners, herbal ingredients, or caffeine. Vitamin waters can provide too much of a good thing, particularly for kids who already take a daily multivitamin.

Getting more than the recommended daily allowance of some vitamins and minerals can be harmful to a child’s health and wellbeing. Most daily allowances listed on labels of vitamin water are recommendations for adults, not children.

The best place for kids to get daily nutrients is from balanced meals, and if you’re concerned that your child is not getting enough, then you should talk to your doctor. He may recommend a daily multivitamin formulated for kids.

Caffeine Safety For Children

The issue with many energy drinks, coffee, and teas is that it can be hard for you to tell how much caffeine you’re drinking. Unfortunately for energy drink fans, there are some valid and authentic explanations why coffee and energy drinks are not treated in the same way.

According to the Center for Food Safety, there have been 18 reported deaths potentially linked to the consumption of one of the energy drinks; 5-Hour Energy and Monster. An official investigation has just been launched.

coffee and energy drinks

In fact, Coffee does have more caffeine than energy drinks, but it is how the caffeine is delivered that seems to be an issue.

  • Energy drinks have very little long-term safety research behind them, while coffee has been extensively researched, and has been used for centuries.
  • They are more than just caffeine, but a combination of caffeine, amino acids, vitamins, and often herbs, and are often high in sugar, while even sweetened coffee would contain less.
  • Some energy drinks like the Monster Energy Drink has 54 grams of sugar, which is equal to 13.5 teaspoons!
  • Coffee is an all-natural beverage, while energy drinks are often laden with artificial preservatives, and flavors.
  • Coffee is sipped, while energy drinks are usually consumed quickly, thus, deliver their dose of caffeine quicker.
  • Energy drinks are sweet and often fruit-flavored, which appeals more to children and teens, in comparison to the bitter-tasting coffee.
  • Energy and sports drink have generated to a list of overdose cases, leading to hospitalization and even deaths, while coffee has very few of these occurrences.

Ideally, children shouldn’t have caffeine. Unfortunately, it’s found in many common foods and beverages like chocolate milk that our children consume these days.

 

Possible Side Effects From Energy Drinks

Children and teens are more at risk of side effects than adults because they tend to weigh less. Their exposure to more active ingredients like caffeine can cause:

  • fast heartbeat
  • high blood pressure
  • headaches
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • impulsive behavior
  • anxiety
  • irritability
  • difficulty sleeping
  • jitteriness and nervousness
  • upset stomach
  • headaches
  • difficulty concentrating
  • difficulty sleeping
  • frequent urination (peeing)

Children with certain physical or mental health conditions may be at higher risk of side effects from energy or sports drink, which can also affect how some medications work.

Few studies have examined the effect of caffeine, which is indeed a stimulant.

Too much caffeine can have even more serious side effects including fast or irregular heartbeats, high blood pressure, hallucinations, and seizures, especially for kids with certain medical conditions or who take medications.

Many of these energy and sports drinks also contain additional ingredients whose safety or effectiveness has never been tested in children.

 

Daily Limit For Caffeine

Ideally, children shouldn’t have caffeine. Unfortunately, it’s found in many common foods and beverages like chocolate milk. Thus, experts have set these daily limits:

  • 4 to 6 years old: no more than 45 mg per day
  • 7 to 9 years old: no more than 62.5 mg per day
  • 10 to 12 years old: no more than 85 mg per day
  • 13 years and older: no more than 2.5 mg per kilogram of body weight, per day

Too much caffeine can leave you with more serious side effects including fast or irregular heartbeats, high blood pressure, hallucinations, and seizures, especially for kids with certain medical conditions or who take medications.

Many of these energy and sports drinks also contain additional ingredients whose safety or effectiveness has never been tested in children.

In conclusion, experts feel that sports drinks and energy drinks are inappropriate hydration sources for children, and they can interfere with sleep, spike blood pressure, and possibly even contribute to substance abuse and mental health problems like increased anxiety.

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